18 Self-Seeding Flowers, Herbs and Veggies That You Just Need To Grow Once

18 Self-Seeding Flowers, Herbs and Veggies That You Just Need To Grow Once

If you are a garden lover, you will love a low maintenance and low-cost garden. And how to have them? The answer is self-seed plants. In the post today, we are so glad to share 18 self-seeding flowers, herbs, and veggies that you just need to grow once, after that you will get for free in a long time. It is great, right? Check them out with us to know about them right now!
18 Self-Seeding Flowers, Herbs and Veggies That You Just Need To Grow Once
Most of the garden cultivars with requiring harvest, store, and then sow collected seeds the following year but self-sowing plants are in contrast. They produce seeds that are so hardy, they drop to the ground in autumn and pop up on their own in spring, this is like a miraculous revival. Evenly, they are also considered volunteers in the world of horticulture since they don’t need to have any effort or intervention on the part of the gardener.

#1 Morning Glory (Ipomoea spp.)

With heart-shaped leaves on twining vines, morning glory blooms with trumpet-shaped flowers in purple, pink, blue, red, or white, opening up in the morning sun. Although morning glory is an annual that will die back completely each winter, it self-sows so prolifically that each generation is more numerous than the last.

#2 Calendula (Calendula officinalis)

Calendula seeds or starts only need be planted once, since this annual flower will reliably repopulate itself each season. Bearing golden daisy-like flowers, calendula is an excellent companion plant for tomatoes, carrots, cucumber, asparagus, peas, lettuce, and more. Calendula also attracts numerous beneficial insects to the garden, including bees, butterflies, and other pollinators, as well as predatory insects like ladybugs and lacewings that will feast on aphids and other “bad guy” insects. Its fragrant leaves are a natural repellent for mosquitos and asparagus beetles too.

#3 Field Poppy (Papaver rhoeas)

Field poppies flower from late spring to early summer. When bloom time is over, its petals drop to reveal a capsule filled with small black seeds. Once this capsule is ripe, it explodes to distribute its seeds that will quickly germinate the following season when the earth is disturbed.

#4 Cosmos (Cosmos bipinnatus)

Cosmos provides a glorious display of blooms all season long – from June until the first frost. While deadheading the flowers will prolong blooming, leave spent flower heads on the plant to ensure it self-sows.

#5 Sweet Alyssum (Lobularia maritima)

Sweet alyssum flowers so profusely throughout the growing season, and each seedpod contains two seeds, it will easily double its numbers each year.

#6 Love-in-a-Mist (Nigella damascena)

Beginning with between 5 and 25 sepals arranged around the stamens, the 1.5-inch flowers eventually develop a large, egg-shaped seed pod in its center. Leave the seed pods on the plant and love-in-a-mist will generously reseed itself.

#7 Giant Larkspur (Consolida ajacis)

After the two month blooming period is over, the flowers give way to seed pods that contain numerous small black seeds.

#8 Honeywort (Cerinthe major ‘Purpurascens’)

In autumn, large black seeds are readily dispersed to ensure a healthy colony the following year.

#9 Garden Angelica (Angelica archangelica)

After it has produced seeds in its second year, garden angelica will die back but will be replaced by the next generation.

#10 Common Blue Violet (Viola sororia)

In summer’s end, the seeds are flung outward via mechanical ejection.

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